Halle Tecco is the Founder & CEO of Natalist. Previously she was the founder of early-stage digital health venture fund Rock Health and an Adjunct Professor at Columbia Business School. Halle started her career working in finance and business development roles at Intel and Apple. She is currently an advisor to the Harvard Medical School Department of Biomedical Informatics and Boston Children’s Hospital.

Halle has appeared in The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, and CNBC. She was named as one of Goldman Sach’s Most Intriguing Entrepreneurs and listed on the Forbes 30 under 30. She received her MBA from Harvard Business School and is currently pursuing her MPH from Johns Hopkins University.

You can follow Halle on Instagram at @halletecco and Twitter at @halletecco.

How did your experience with fertility inspire you to help start Natalist?

My own personal fertility journey opened my eyes to the enormous opportunity to rebuild the entire experience for families. It took me over four years and a good deal of science to become a mom. During those long months of repeated negative pregnancy tests, I felt disconnected from my body which just wasn’t getting pregnant. I was lost in a sea of junk science on the internet, as well as products that just didn’t speak to me as a millennial woman. Creating a new human is one of the most exciting, yet vulnerable, times in your life. I wanted to build something that helps women cut through the crap. And also makes the experience a little more beautiful and special.

Share a little about yourself—the things we wouldn’t learn from simply reading your professional bio.

I'm an avid gardener. I love being closer to nature and our food system as well as the sense of accomplishment I feel watching the garden grow. It forces me to slow down and practice patience, while giving me some zen time to clear my mind for new ideas.

What do you want to tell someone trying to conceive or already pregnant?

Make self-care a priority during this special time in your life. Self-care is more than just bubble baths and face masks. Self-care means educating and empowering yourself with knowledge. It’s about owning your journey and taking care of your physical and mental health.

What’s something you wish someone told you while trying to conceive?

Honestly, I heard (and continue to hear) it all. Sometimes it’s not about being told how to do it. Especially for those struggling to conceive, an ear to listen or a shoulder to cry on is far more powerful than any advice.

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